You Must Go See The Movie – Selma

Seeing the movie Selma made me realize that racism is something that all people have to deal with in one form of another. A few weeks ago, we talked about the Racial Lens. The racial problem is a human condition and it affects everybody in a different way.

I have Cerebral Palsy. I can walk and talk, but people have a hard time understanding me. There are others who have cerebral palsy and are affected differently.

When Selma made the national news, Dr. King saw the nation needed to be involved in movement. Now movies like Selma tend to make-up minor details, but I know the story of Viola Liuzzo from Detroit who came to help and never went  home.

I found  this video about Viola Liuzzo (Facebook Video) which this tells who she was and why she went to Selma.

The worst injured from the movement in Selma was James Reeb, a white Unitarian Universalist minister from Boston. Selma’s public hospital refused to treat Rev. Reeb, who had to be taken to Birmingham’s University Hospital which was two hours away. Reeb died on Thursday, March 11 at University Hospital, with his wife by his side.

It is extremely important to realize that racism is a human problem.

African Americans need to see this movie.

Happy New Year!

happy-new-year-2015-wallpapers-4

Happy New Year! Can you believe another year has just begun.  There is something that I learned as a child, silence is golden. Is this true all of the time? 

Read the poem below and think about when is silence golden or when is silence ungolden?  

Silence is golden when it enables a person to think, pray,

and to be at peace, to meditate to his God.

Silence is golden when it enables a group of people to enjoy

a play, movie, sermon, or some music.

Silence is golden when it enables a student to learn

 different things as he grows.

Silence is golden when it enables a doctor to think of the best

way to heal the patient.

Silence is golden when we can hear the information given on the television or radio that saves lives

such as a  newscast when there is bad weather.

Silence is golden when it enables a person to read for pleasure.

Silence is golden when it does not hurt.

Silence is ungolden when a student is graduating from high

school and cannot read.

Silence is ungolden when a teacher sees that a student is hungry

day after day and does nothing about it.

Silence is ungolden when racism is allowed to go on.

Silence is ungolden when a person knows that others are being abused, sexually, verbally, physically or mentally and does nothing about it.

Copyright © 2014 Lydia E. Brew

Remembering What’s Important This Holiday Season

Lydia's Card

Sometimes we forget why certain things are traditional. In October, the stores are already marketing for Christmas sales. Sometimes I think that we forget that we give gifts for Christmas because God gave the world his only Son.

“Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us” – Matthew 1:23

My pastor recently asked a question. He wanted to know what we thought Jesus would want on the day we celebrate as his birthday.

I believe Jesus would want the following:

  • Hope – Society should have the expectation for good things to occur.
  • Love – Do we really try to love everybody?
  • Peace – Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me.
  • Justice – Society need to be fair and respectful. Yes, there are a lot of things that needs fixing when it comes to justice. However, not respecting law enforcement when they are trying to respect one of their own is not one of them, especially when it this close Christmas.

We cannot buy these things, but we have the opportunity to honor Jesus by attempting spread hope, love, peace and justice this week and into the new year.

Happy Holidays!

We’re All Wearing the Racial Lens

 

Machovka_Glasses

It is hard for African Americans to be totally objective when it comes to race United States. It is equally hard for White Americans. Huh? We all are wearing the racial lens on our eyes and we can’t see straight.

When thinking of how the United States was founded it was based on freedom, especially freedom of religion. The United States was to be the picture of a beautiful “world” where everybody would free. All men would be equal. However, here we are at the end of 2014 and we’re still not there yet.

I believe some of the Founding Fathers did want everyone to be free, but the slave owners needed their slaves. Believe it or not slavery was about money NOT one’s skin color or the intelligence of the Negro. The Founding Fathers needed the Southern colonies to ratify (approve) the Constitution that would abolish slavery, so the Negro became three-fifths of a person. Perhaps the Founding Fathers thought that eventually all citizens of the United States would be free.

Instead many were told that the Negro was from Africa and that they ware inferior to the White man. Africa is the cradle of humanity. 

Native Americans who were here first, and later forced on reservations, when they rebelled, the United States went to war. People were told that Native Americans were not civilized, so they were treated badly.

The list of what people are told about other races goes on and on.

Even after the Civil War, the Emancipation of the slaves, the Civil Rights movement, and even now with an African American president, there is still something we can’t quite get together.

Many White Americans and African Americans can’t seem to understand that there is just one race. We are confusing race with culture. We need to remember the past by trying to let each and every person, black, white, homosexuals, whoever live the American Dream. The racial lens needs to be removed from our eyes. Somehow we have to stop letting the history of racism control our future existence together.

Shortly after President Obama was sworn in, a college professor lost his keys and broke into his own house. The man was an African American professor and the officer who showed up on the scene was White. The professor was under stress and had his racial lens on. The officer was trying to get the facts. He was doing his job – he did not know that the man lived there. The professor did not see that the officer was investigating a crime. All he saw was the racial turmoil history that the United States can’t seem to find a solution for continuous racial problems.

The racial problem is a human condition and it affects everybody in a different way. We need to take off our racial lens and see the problems in society. Ferguson and the “I Can’t Breath” cases are not just about racism, but point to a United States that can’t seems to be the nation that the Founding Fathers envisioned.

Ungolden Silence – My Thoughts on Bill Cosby

Like many Americans I loved The Cosby Show.  My favorite scene was when the family sang “Night and Day,” by Ray Charles (see the video above). I have to watch that scene now and remember Heathcliff Huxtable and his family were fictional characters though they were all well-loved.

The accusations eighteen women have brought to light in recent months, should not be ignored, just because the man is famous, well-loved and respected. Mr. Cosby stated recently these accusations are not worth discussing.   This will not work because these accusations are serious and they keep coming. Just on December 11, 2014, Beverly Johnson told her story to Vanity Fair.

Here is what she included at the bottom of the intense article –

For a long time I thought it was something that only happened to me, and that I was somehow responsible. So I kept my secret to myself, believing this truth needed to remain in the darkness. But the last four weeks have changed everything, as so many women have shared similar stories, of which the press have belatedly taken heed. – Beverly Johnson

Society, we can no longer ignore these women.

The fact is many women have been raped and chose to told no one for the very reasons we’re seeing played out with Mr. Cosby now. After being traumatized, a woman can become paralyzed in her thoughts – ‘who would believe me’ – especially when their perpetrator could be such a well-respected male in the community.

I have always wondered why news organizations are asked to protect the victim’s names.  A woman told me since rape is a violation against a woman’s body, that it is personal. Yes, I understand it is a personal violation, but if these women don’t come forward, they leave another woman open to experience a similar violation too. Look how many in this case didn’t speak up and are just now breaking their silence, in some cases way past the statue of limitations.

We’re at fault. We encourage the silence as a society. Surely, when a victim comes forward and name their abuser, the first question must not be, “Are you telling the truth?”

I do NOT want to believe Mr. Cosby would violate a woman, definitely not as many as those who have come forward in recent months. We as a society must hear these women and allow them to come forward when they have been sexually assaulted.  We as a society must give the victims of sexual assaults respect by taking their accusations seriously.  Their voices have to be heard. 

Now don’t get me wrong, those women who falsely accused a man of rape, they need to go to jail. Once the accusations are out there it cannot be erased and a woman who would do such a thing needs to go to jail.

I just don’t think this is the case with Mr. Cosby right now.